Archive for the ‘Cookware Videos’ Category

Cookware Materials Video: Overview About Different Kinds of Cookware Materials

Saturday, August 21st, 2010

Here is a really good video by Rita Heikenfeld where she gives a good overview about different kinds of cookware materials.

She starts out with cast-iron cookware

  • needs to be seasoned and dried well
  • will never will wear out
  • heavy
  • natural nonstick
  • can use with metal cooking utensils
  • don’t use any kinds of spray
  • don’t use any kinds of spray to season, just wipe out with a little oil, 250 degree in oven, put a piece of foil on it and its okay.

Enameled cast-iron:

  • oven-proof
  • holds the heat (really good insulator)
  • some can be used with metal cooking utensils, some can not
  • don’t use any kinds of spray to season, just wipe out with a little oil, 250 degree in oven, put a piece of foil on it and its okay.

Aluminum pots:

  • not anodized aluminum
  • old aluminum pots might cause Alzheimers
  • don’t put acidic ingredients inside (tomatoes, etc.)
  • great conductor of heat
  • you CAN cook acidic foods in ANODIZED aluminum cookware
  • look for riveted handles that won’t fall off
  • handles from stainless steel (on it’s own it is a bad conductor of heat, so you don’t burn your hands)
  • always need some (real) oil, not spray
  • just use a bit of olive oil or canola oil

Stainless steel cookware:

  • beautiful and shiny
  • nonreactive – you can cook anything with it
  • can use stainless metal utensils
  • look for: on bottom of the pan, should be a pressure plied disk, for better heat conduction (best with copper, but aluminum is okay too)

How To Buy A Wok

Thursday, July 10th, 2008

This is a great video on how to select a wok.

Brandon explains why using a wok isn’t the same at home as it is in an Asian restaurant /street stall, because the flame of the burner is really high and big, not like what you get on your stove.

But you can still use woks – it’s best to use very thin aluminum woks. But if you have very high flames for special wok cookers (not your normal stove) then steel is better, but again, 99% change the thin aluminum wok is better for you.

Other important points

  • long handle
  • bottom part for cooking and side area to “park” food on the side
  • lightweight (so it’s easy to lift)

How To Handle Stainless Steel Cookware

Saturday, May 10th, 2008

Stainless steel is really the champion when it comes to durability in high quality cookware. A good stainless steel pot can last you a lifetime.
There are still some things you want to do to maintain your stainless steel cookware perfectly spotless and shiny – because even thought it is very (more…)